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Youth Suicide Prevention

Join us online* for
"A Conversation Worth Having with Your Student"

Wednesday, Sept. 29 at 6:30 p.m.
Zoom Link

*Due to concerns about the increase in COVID-19 cases, our in-person events will now be held as ONE VIRTUAL event. Families and students of all grades levels are welcome to join.

Myth

Fact

Suicide is selfish.

Suicide may be self-focused, but that is very different than selfish. In fact, many suicides are driven by the idea that one is a burden to others.

Myth

Fact

Talking about suicide will encourage suicide attempts.

Talking about suicide provides the opportunity for communication. The first step in encouraging person with thoughts of suicide to live comes from talking about those feelings.

Myth

Fact

People who threaten suicide are just seeking attention.

All suicide attempts must be treated as though the person has the intent to die. Do not dismiss a suicide attempt as simply being an attention-gaining device. The attention they get may well save their lives.

Myth

Fact

Most suicides occur in winter months when the weather is poor.

Adolescent suicidal behavior is most common during the spring and early summer months.

Myth

Fact

Sudden improvement in mental state means suicidal crisis is over.

The opposite may be true. In the three months following an attempt, a young person is at most risk of dying by suicide. The apparent lifting of the problems could mean the person has made a firm decision to die by suicide and feels better because of this decision.

Warning Signs:

Direct verbal clues:
"I wish I were dead" or "I'm going to end it all."

Indirect verbal clues:
"You're going to regret how you treated me" or "My family would be better off without me."

Behavioral clues:
Giving away money or prized possessions, changes in behavior, general confusion.

Situational clues:
Sudden rejection by a loved one, a recent move (especially if unwanted), death of a parent or friend.

Where to get Help:

  • Call 911
  • Emergency room
  • Georgia Crisis Line: 1-800-715-4225
  • SummitRidge: 678-442-5858
  • Ridgeview: 770-454-5589
  • Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

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